TWINART Photography

benedek
henri bristol
horace bristol
broomfield
brynner
dunas
getty
farley
hellman
hurrell
kilmer-alborzi
lennard
mills
stivers
sullivan
twinart
york
 



Life
1987
Polaroid lightbox
24" X 30"
Edition of 5

 

TWINART

REWIND > FAST FORWARD
Vintage Polaroids 20 x 24
1987 > 2007

 


Instant
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 


Charade
1989
Polaroid lightbox
11" X 14"
Edition of 5

 


Contempt
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 


Bab-o
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"

24" X 30" framed

 


Bongo
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed


Enquiring Minds
1989
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed


Fire
1989
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed
 


H2O
1989
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 


White Rain
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 


Tomorrow
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 

Meat
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed
 


Climax
1989
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 

East West
1992
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed
 


Win A $25,000 Home
1987
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 


Aura 1
1992
Polaroid 20" X 24"
24" X 30" framed

 


Aura 2
1993
Polaroid lightbox
16" X 20"
Edition of 5


TWINART

REWIND > FAST FORWARD

TwinArt’s Instant Replay series produced between 1987 and 1993, on view at the Frank Pictures Gallery in Santa Monica this spring, confirms Polaroid founder Edwin H. Land's conviction that artists would be the ones to lead in the development of photographic technology. Land, who had hired Ansel Adams to freely work with the first "instant" Polaroid camera he produced in 1948, set up a program in the 1970s to encourage artists to explore the creative potential of his instant cameras – simultaneously sponsoring innovation in the new medium and building a unique corporate art collection. Along with Chuck Close, David Hockney, William Wegman, and Ellen Carey, Ellen and Lynda Kahn were among the artists sponsored by Polaroid to work with the large-format 20x24 instant camera Edwin Land developed in 1977. As part of Polaroid's Artist Support program, TwinArt was invited to the now legendary 20x24 Studio in Boston. Their first 20x24 photographs juxtaposed brand-name products like Hostess Twinkies and Nestlé's Quick with eclectic props and ephemera including religious icons, miniature robots, electric light bulbs, and exotic food packaging. Where the hyper-real images of products and stereotypes collided, the perfect world they advertised was challenged, and ironies emerged.

The following year, TwinArt was again invited by Polaroid to the new 20x24 Studio in Soho, New York. The result was their Instant Replay series, which exposed the dream of the effortless, "instant" life as a mirage mirrored in the parallel and reciprocal realms of advertising and consumerism. The unique Polaroid prints TwinArt produced during this period exposed the contradiction between glossy and lushly color-saturated photography (one of the commercial purposes that drove the 20x24 camera's invention) and the grainy look of video TwinArt had been exploiting since the 1970s. The complex images in this series combined figures from different professions and lifestyles as well as actors selling products like shampoo and lipstick and dwelled on the packaging for household cleaning products. Nuanced media messages were remixed to give the pop sensibility a critical edge. Devo’s hit song It’s a Beautiful World could have been the soundtrack for this body of work in which TwinArt recycled video clips captured as freeze frames, superimposing them with fragments of print ads.

Today, these vintage images have the feel of the "re-mix" avant la lettre, as if – like David Bowie in Nicolas Roeg's classic 1976 film The Man Who Fell to Earth – the viewer were watching multiple TV channels at once. TwinArt's 20x24 Polaroids are an homage to French New Wave cinema, and in particular to Godard, whose video experiments during the 1970s were an inspiration to the Kahn sisters. Proffering the commercial product as icon, Instant Replay also invokes the work of Andy Warhol, Kenneth Anger, Stan Brackage, Bruce Connor. TwinArt's video works have been exhibited at the Kitchen, Mudd Club, Franklin Furnace, and Anthology Archive in New York, and at the 1986 Tokyo Video Biennale. Privileged to have been selected three times by Polaroid to participate in the Artist Support Program, Ellen and Lynda Kahn were also awarded a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in New Media in 1981. Their art work has been exhibited internationally in museums and galleries, including the Whitney Museum of American Art Image World 1990, the Metropolitan Museum of Art Pucci Love 1991, and the Pompidou Center in Paris Instant This – Instant That 1982, and is represented in the corporate art collections of Absolut Vodka, Polaroid, Bell+Howell, and Best Products.

Today, Emmy Award-winning Ellen and Lynda Kahn are still the creative force of TwinArt, a bi-coastal company based in New York City and Los Angeles which conceptualizes ideas, builds brands and stylizes pop culture. With a focus on the visual media – photography, film, video, and graphic design – their work appears everywhere from film to broadcast television, commercials, print ads, museums, and billboards. Together, the dynamic duo has brought their artistic edge-sensibility to projects for Absolut Vodka, Martini & Rossi, and Polaroid, among others.


 
 
 
 
 
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